Friday, April 29, 2011

TOS Review: Greek 'n' Stuff Bible Study Materials


I've often heard about Greek 'N' Stuff's language materials, but until this year I did not realize that they also offered Bible study options.

Over the course of the past several months, Brennan has been working through the I Can Study Jonah and Ruth Alone with God workbook.

This particular study is divided into 13 weeks of lessons with a short assignment for Monday through Saturday of each week. Each week covers approximately 10-12 verses, one or two of which is designated as the week's memory verse. Each day the student is directed to pray, read (or recite) the memory verse, read the passage, and then answer 2-3 simple questions based on the passage. Greek 'N' Stuff claims, "The questions are so simple, the Bible is the only answer key you need." At the end of the week, the materials present a more in-depth question to think and pray about.

The Alone with God series of materials were written for middle to upper elementary students. As a fourth grader, Brennan fits perfectly into the intended audience range. After working with the materials, I think they could even be used for a younger student. I think it would be appropriate for students as soon as they could read and understand short Bible passages on their own.

These materials were easy for Brennan to do independently. He learned the factual knowledge, but I'm not sure he made the jump to actually thinking about the Bible passages and applying it to his life. Even though he could answer the questions, he still needs parental guidance to move past the easy facts. It was more beneficial for him when I started looking over his work and discussing the application question with him at the end of the week..

Greek 'N' Stuff offers other materials in their Alone With God series -- Esther, 1 Samuel, and Acts. You can choose to order the materials that correspond with either KJV or NIV. Because the studies vary in length, the prices vary. I Can Study Jonah and Ruth costs $8.95, and the most expensive one (Acts) is only $23.95 for 52 weeks of material.

You can see sample pages of all four of the different Bible studies here. If you'd like to see a longer sample, be sure to check out The Old Schoolhouse Magazine's 2011 Freebie Directory. The Greek 'N' Stuff download on that page will let you see a complete week of lessons out of the 1 Samuel workbook. (It's about three-fourths of the way through the sample.)

I'm considering using I Can Study Acts Alone with God for Brennan's Bible study in the future. In my mind, Acts would be a perfect book to be taught using the factual read and answer questions method, and I'd like for Brennan to be exposed to all of the early church history that is recorded in Acts.

As always, if you'd like to read what other homeschool families thought about their time spent using materials from Greek n' Stuff with their children, please visit The Old Schoolhouse Review Crew blog here. Some of the other crew members reviewed the Alone with God Bible study products, and other bloggers reviewed their Latin and Greek materials.

I received a free copy of the I Can Study Jonah and Ruth workbook as a member of the 2010 TOS Homeschool Review Crew, and I received no other compensation. In return, I agreed to give an honest review of the materials and how they worked for my homeschool family.


Wednesday, April 27, 2011

TOS Review: Writing Tales

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I can't remember if I've blogged about my search for the Holy Grail or if I've just intended to post about my ongoing quest. Several years ago, I was in a online discussion about various Language Arts programs. I likened my search for the perfect program as a quest for the Holy Grail. Recently, I guess I've given up on finding the one program that encompasses all aspects of Language Arts, and I've been trying to find quality programs to teach each aspect individually.

Recently, my children and I have been using Writing Tales, and I can see how it would fill many of our Language Arts needs. Perhaps I've stumbled across the Holy Grail just as I had given up my search.

Writing Tales is based on the Classical model of having a student learn to write by copying good writing. As they work through the materials, students will study and then rewrite fables, legends, and other stories. Writing Tales adds their own unique twist to the traditional method of simply having the child rewrite the story. After writing a first draft of the story that is a strict retelling of the original, the student can then add embellishments to the story for their final draft.

In addition to teaching composition skills, Writing Tales includes grammar instruction and relates it to the story being analyzed each week. The grammar in these books appears simple at first, but I found that it covered many advanced concepts. The Level One book teaches the basic rules for punctuation and the eight parts of speech. Students also learn how to correct punctuate both direct and indirect quotations. The Level Two materials go a few steps farther by expanding on these concepts. For instance, this level covers reasons to use action verbs rather than state-of-being verbs, reasons to start a new paragraph, and ten different ways to begin a sentence. (You can see a full list of grammar concepts in these books on their Scope and Sequence page.)

PhotobucketBrennan used the Level One materials, which are geared towards a third or fourth grader. Prior to using these materials, most of his writing instruction has been focused on having him narrate a story or history lesson that I read to him. I found out that he's learned quite a bit by doing our narration exercises. He's able to retell the story and even write down a version in his own words. He found the idea of writing a final draft with embellishments to be somewhat difficult, though. I am reminded of a book that I reviewed earlier this year that talked about the academic differences between boys and girls. Boys tend to add action type details, whereas girls can often add richer descriptions and lots of adjective. Brennan's embellished versions of the stories added in so much action that it was hard to identify which fable it was based on. For instance, he originally wrote a good retelling of "The Crow and the Pitcher." In his later version, the crow became a snake who fell into a glass bottle, got trapped, and then used a gun to shoot his way out. I suggested that he leave out a few of those extra details before we called his final draft complete. I'm impressed with how much his writing has grown over the past few months of using the materials. Perhaps more importantly, I'm no longer hearing moans of agony when he's asked to finish a writing assignment.

PhotobucketWriting Tales Level Two is intended for fourth or fifth graders, and I had Addison (seventh grader) try it out for purposes of this review. She was already good at retelling stories, and she prefers to write fiction. She enjoys the way that Writing Tales allows her to adapt the stories and make them her own. When she wrote the first one, she typed up her adaptation and even included clip-art illustrations. Later stories in this book introduce the student to the idea of making a story their own but staying true to the historical facts. For instance, in the story of baby Moses, she could name some of the servants that accompanied the princess, describe how Moses was hidden for three months, etc. Writing Tales Level Two prepares a student to write a story that is roughly two or three pages long. Addison recommends these materials for fifth graders and thinks it would be good for learning to write stories. In some of her other schoolwork this year, she has been working on answering essay type questions, and she pointed out that these material are not intended to teach that style of writing.

With the addition of longer books to read, Writing Tales could be a complete Language Arts curriculum for elementary students. It focuses on both composition and writing instruction, and it also includes some handwriting, vocabulary, and spelling. For an average student, the Writing Tales materials would adequately meet all of those needs. It was fairly easy to add in additional copywork practice and a seperate spelling program for my student that needs additional practice in those areas.

Writing Tales Level 1 costs $19.95 for the student workbook and $24.95 for the teacher's manual. Level 2 costs $24.95 for the workbook and $32.95 for the teacher's manual. I just noticed that they are having a big sale if you order through their website next week -- 20% off plus free shipping from May 2nd to May 9th.

If you'd like to read what other homeschool families thought about their time spent using Writing Tales with their children, please visit The Old Schoolhouse Review Crew blog here.

I received Writing Tales Level One and Level Two materials (student workbook and teacher's manual) for free as a member of the 2010 TOS Homeschool Review Crew, and I received no other compensation. In return, I agreed to give an honest review of the materials and how they worked for my homeschool family.





Thursday, April 21, 2011

Reading Aloud Challenge -- April 21

This week, I've been refocusing my effort to read aloud to my children. Time to share books is often in the hustle and bustle of writing assignments, independent reading, math problems, and science classes.

Addison and Brennan are currently listening to me read Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I chose this book a few weeks ago in the hopes that Lauren would join us, but she tends to wander off whenever I pull it out. At this point, I'm thankful that I can read to the big kids without constant interruptions -- maybe we'll work on family read-alouds again some other time.

We should finish Farmer Boy by the beginning of next week. I'm not sure what we'll read next. I looked through the books remaining in Addison's schoolwork for this year, and I'm leaning towards reading either Rascal by Sterling North or The Incredible Journey by Sheila Burnford.

Even though Lauren isn't interested in Farmer Boy, she is very interested in other books. I didn't keep track of all of the picture books we read this week. I seem to remember some Froggy books, a Fancy Nancy or two, and maybe Pinkalicious. I need to download the New York City Public Library's 100 best picture books list and start working our way through it methodically.

Some of our favorite books this week were from Kate DiCamillo's Mercy Watson series. We read Mercy Watson Thinks Like a Pig one morning at home, and then read over half of Mercy Watson Something Wonky This Way Comes while waiting at a doctor's appointment Tuesday afternoon. I enjoy reading about the pig's escapades and about all of the interesting people he meets along the way. This afternoon we checked four more Mercy Watson books out of the library.


For most the week, Lauren's been obsessed with Junie B. Jones. We have a few of the audio CD collections, and she wants to listen to them every time we are in the car. The rest of the family  is now so tired of hearing them that I moved her carseat into the back row of the van. I can turn the volume up in the back so that she can hear it and mute it in the front so that I don't have to.

I know some families don't like Junie B. Honestly, I really don't mind the books, as long as they are enjoyed in moderation. We passed moderation a long time ago. My biggest complain about the Junie B. Jones books isn't the grammar. I can overlook the times when Junie B. talks about how she "runned speedy quick." What grates on my nerves is the lines that repeat themselves over and over again in every single book. For instance, every book starts with the line, "My names is Junie B. Jones. The B stands for Beatrice. Except I don't like Beatrice. I just like B and that's all." Every book also talks about Junie B's teacher named Mrs. "Her name is Mrs. She has another name, too. But I just like Mrs. and that's all." She also refers to her friends as "that Grace," "Crybaby William," and "that meanie Jim." None of those seem annoying when I type them tonight or even when I heard them the first half-dozen times. By now, though, I'm a bit tired of Junie B. Jones.

In addition to the audiobook CDs that Lauren plays both at home and in the car, I read three of the books to her this week. She had a chance to ask me some questions, and we talked a bit about some of what was going on. Unfortunately, she's listened to the audio versions so often that she can correct me anytime I get even a single word wrong.

Next week, I'll be reading more Mercy Watson books to Lauren. Plus, also, some Junie B. Jones apparently. Does anybody have any other book suggestions that will help me maintain what's left of my sanity?

If you'd like to see what other homeschool moms are reading aloud to their children, please visit my friend Debra's blog Footprints in the Butter. She's challenged us to join her in posting our read-aloud list each week.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

TOS Review: Growing Healthy Homes

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It often seems like I learn as much about life as I do about traditional school subjects when I review a product. Most recently, I reviewed a product that taught me that my first impressions aren't always to be trusted.

Nutrition 101: Choose Life! is a health/nutrition program published by Growing Healthy Homes, LLC. At first glance, I didn't like the program at all. I was a bit put off by what I interpreted as a push towards  alternative medical treatments. My own experiences color my perception, and I often feel that the choice is either one or the other and not a choice of what parts of each approach are most appropriate for the situation. Since we've obviously chosen a traditional medical approach for most of Lauren's needs, I often feel defensive when reading materials written by proponents of a more natural approach.

Once I decided to set aside my initial reservations, I dug into the materials and found that I was quite impressed with the information included in the book. Nutrition 101 has 448 pages that are packed full of health information. The six units each cover a body system, how it functions, some common diseases that could affect it, and perhaps most importantly how good nutritional habits will benefit that specific part of the body.

PhotobucketI always like lots of information when picking school materials, so perhaps it will be best to share a bit about what all is included in each unit. The Unit on the Digestive System starts with chapter giving a five page overview of the digestive process. Even though it's not lengthy, it's very detailed. I have rarely seen materials that include this many details. All of the relevant organs are discussed, including the liver, pancreas, and gallbladder. It even discussed the various parts of the small intestine. Each chapter includes discussion questions, activities for all ages of students, and a recipe to try. The other chapters in the digestive unit include one on Digestive Health and Nutrition, one on Enzymes (including enzyme supplements), and Elimination. In addition to the recipes for each chapter, the unit as a whole includes eight additional recipes that showcase the healthy foods that are being discussed. We baked the Spice cookies (oat-based), and they received a thumbs' up from my picky taste testers. I also enjoyed the Quinoa Vegetable Risotto that I fixed for myself one day.

This book is absolutely gorgeous. The diagrams and pictures really help to make the materials easy to understand. I read large portions of the materials on my nook in black and white, and it simply does not compare to reading it in full-color on the computer screen. In addition, the pictures of the prepared foods make me want to fix (and sample) all of the recipes.

The best way to get a feel for this book is to look at the sample pages available here. You can read the entire table of contents, including a complete list of the information contained in the 30 appendices. Be sure to look at the lung diagram on page 101; it's a good example of the exceptional illustrations included in these materials.

This book is definitely not a product to rush through; reading through all of the materials in a week left me feeling more than just a bit overwhelmed. The authors include a sample schedule in the introduction that shows how to cover a chapter per week. There are plenty of activities and opportunities for further research that the book would easily stretch the 24 chapters so that they would fill an entire school year. If you work through the book slowly, your family would have the opportunity to make gradual improvements in your diet that will lead to better health. These sorts of changes would seem less daunting when implemented slowly, one at a time.

Nutrition 101: Choose Life! is available as a hardcover book for $99.95, on CD for $79.95, or as a combination pack including both book and CD for $129.95. Growing Healthy Homes is currently offering a 15% discount coupon by using the code TOScrew11.

If you would like to find out more information about Growing Healthy Homes and their Nutrition 101: Choose Life! materials, you can join them for a live webinar on Thursday, April 21st. Details are available here. As always, if you would like to see what other Crew members thought of the Nutrition 101 course, you can find the links to their review on The Old Schoolhouse Crew blog.

I received an electronic version of Growing Healthy Homes for free as a member of the 2010 TOS Homeschool Review Crew, and I received no other compensation. In return, I agreed to give an honest review of the materials and how they worked for my homeschool family.


Sunday, April 17, 2011

Homeschool Mother's Journal -- Week 13

The Homeschool Chick

In my life this week...
We took a few days of vacation early in the week to enjoy having my parents visiting. I think my parents got more than just a peek at how crazy our lives sometimes are. Late Friday afternoon, some of Lauren's doctors decided that they needed to see her first thing Monday morning (7:30 am).  Another doctor's appointment was rescheduled at the last minute and fell during their visit too. Thankfully, we still managed to squeeze in a quick birthday celebration for Addison, a baseball game for Brennan, some fabric shopping with the girls, and more.

In our homeschool this week...
After a few days of vacation, we had a hard time settling back into a routine. Maybe next time we'll try to schedule our break for the end of the week instead of the beginning. It probably would have been easier if I had prepared lessons ahead of time and had them all ready to go when vacation's over.

Places we're going and people we're seeing...
The first part of the week is packed full of all the usual appointments, activities and baseball games. This weekend should be a lot of fun. Both of the big kids have been working all year to prepare for the Leadership Training for Christ competition in Rogers, AR this weekend. We have a large group from church going, and the kids will be competing in puppets, choir, song leading, drama, and more. We're all super excited!

(Note: the kids are even more excited now that we realized our mistake in making travel arrangements. Since we're new to this church, we didn't know that most of the kids ride the church bus/van and the parents follow along. Silly us just assumed that our kids would be riding in our van. Thankfully, there was still room on the church vehicles so that they can ride with all the "cool kids" on the bus.)

My favorite thing this week...
My mom taught me some of the basics of my sewing machine and how to sew patches on Brennan's scout uniform, and I had a lot of fun exploring a sewing shop on the other side of town with her.  I love looking through all the cute patterns and pretty fabrics. I have moments when I think of how much I'd like to start sewing. Then I realize how little free time I have and decide that maybe I'll just stick with knitting -- it's easier to toss in my tote bag and work on here, there, and whatever waiting room I'm currently sitting in.

What's working/not working for us...
Not working -- bedtime. Lauren went to bed an hour and a half ago, and she just wandered in here to get me to untangle the hair that she tried to braid. Unfortunately, late nights do not equal sleeping later in the morning. I have no idea how she functions on so little sleep.

Homeschool thoughts/questions I have...
I just downloaded some of the new The Old Schoolhouse Planners, and I'm trying to figure out which forms I want to use to make my master binder for next school year. I think I'm going to try a new weekly schedule form for Brennan this week and see if we like it better than our old one.

A photo, video or quote to share...

Homeschool Mother's Journal

The Homeschool Chick

In my life this week...
We took a few days of vacation early in the week to enjoy having my parents visiting. I think my parents got more than just a peek at how crazy our lives sometimes are. Late Friday afternoon, some of Lauren's doctors decided that they needed to see her first thing Monday morning (7:30 am).  Another doctor's appointment was rescheduled at the last minute and fell during their visit too. Thankfully, we still managed to squeeze in a quick birthday celebration for Addison, a baseball game for Brennan, some fabric shopping with the girls, and more.

In our homeschool this week...
After a few days of vacation, we had a hard time settling back into a routine. Maybe next time we'll try to schedule our break for the end of the week instead of the beginning. It probably would have been easier if I had prepared lessons ahead of time and had them all ready to go when vacation's over.

Places we're going and people we're seeing...
The first part of the week is packed full of all the usual appointments, activities and baseball games. This weekend should be a lot of fun. Both of the big kids have been working all year to prepare for the Leadership Training for Christ competition in Rogers, AR this weekend. We have a large group from church going, and the kids will be competing in puppets, choir, song leading, drama, and more. We're all super excited!

(Note: the kids are even more excited now that we realized our mistake in making travel arrangements. Since we're new to this church, we didn't know that most of the kids ride the church bus/van and the parents follow along. Silly us just assumed that our kids would be riding in our van. Thankfully, there was still room on the church vehicles so that they can ride with all the "cool kids" on the bus.)

My favorite thing this week...
My mom taught me some of the basics of my sewing machine and how to sew patches on Brennan's scout uniform, and I had a lot of fun exploring a sewing shop on the other side of town with her.  I love looking through all the cute patterns and pretty fabrics. I have moments when I think of how much I'd like to start sewing. Then I realize how little free time I have and decide that maybe I'll just stick with knitting -- it's easier to toss in my tote bag and work on here, there, and whatever waiting room I'm currently sitting in.

What's working/not working for us...
Not working -- bedtime. Lauren went to bed an hour and a half ago, and she just wandered in here to get me to untangle the hair that she tried to braid. Unfortunately, late nights do not equal sleeping later in the morning. I have no idea how she functions on so little sleep.

Homeschool thoughts/questions I have...
I just downloaded some of the new The Old Schoolhouse Planners, and I'm trying to figure out which forms I want to use to make my master binder for next school year. I think I'm going to try a new weekly schedule form for Brennan this week and see if we like it better than our old one.

A photo, video or quote to share...

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

TOS Review: Kinderbach

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When Lauren spent so long in the hospital a few years ago, one of the highlights of her week was music time. When she was healthy enough, she joined music group in the playroom a couple of mornings a week. She also had at least one or two private music therapy sessions each week. When we came home, I never found any music activities for her to participate in. In fact, I had almost forgotten how much she loved music until we were chosen to do a review for KinderBach.

KinderBach is a music introduction program for 3 to 7 year olds that combines video instruction with hands-on piano activities. It is organized into 60 weeks of lessons with four short video segments for each week. The lessons are accompanied by printable activity books which contain games, puzzles, coloring pages, and printable music.

In some of the first lessons, Lauren practiced identifying high and low notes while listening to a piece. Based on the sounds played on the video, she would either reach up high or stoop down low. She enjoyed this activity so much that we watched that video segment over and over again. The corresponding printable page had her color the apples on the tree for high notes or color the ones on the ground for low notes.

She also really enjoyed the videos that encouraged her to use a rhythm instrument and play along. There wasn't a need to find anything fancy; she was happy to have wooden spoons to tap together or an empty container to use as a drum.

In this picture, Lauren was working on week 5 of the program. After watching the video on the computer, we walked into the living room and found the new keys. This lesson introduced the groups of three black keys, which were referred to as train stations. We returned to the computer and watched a song introduced in the next video session. She returned to the piano to play the new song. (Before you get too excited about playing a song so quickly, the song was just the train station keys played in a quarter note pattern. I sang along.)


I am very impressed with the amount of music knowledge a preschooler would acquire working through the KinderBach program. According to their website, "Kids will enjoy playing simple songs, identifying music direction, learning new rhythm notes and their beat value. Level 1 to 6 covers proper hand and finger position for the music scale, as well as staff note reading by pattern for voice and keyboard." Even though Lauren has only started the program, I watched videos from all the levels to see what was covered. This isn't just a piano playing program; a child will acquire a large music vocabulary and lots of music theory. In one video from Level 6, I watched the instructor talk a student through a new piece of music -- she talked about the time signature, the fact that it was to be played loudly (forte), and more. In level 6, the student will be playing simple songs like London Bridge or Old MacDonald's Farm.

As part of my review, I was able to preview the Level 7 materials that should be released in August 2011, and I continue to be impressed. These lessons will cover chords, solfege for singing, playing songs by ear, and more.

KinderBach is available as a one-year subscription for $95.88 or as a monthly subscription for $19.99 per month.

Honestly, I wasn't sure what I thought about KinderBach when we started. As we continued to use it, I've really been impressed. Lauren loves watching the videos, and I've noticed her stopping by the piano occasionally to play a few notes. I remember how much Lauren loved her music opportunities in the past, and I think that KinderBach is a perfect way to allow her to pursue those interests at home. I've already decided on a lot of the academic curriculum she'll use next year, and I'm strongly considering adding KinderBach to her schedule. It can be her special subject to pursue -- one that's perhaps not essential for a Kindergarten curriculum, but perfect for her.

If you'd like to read what other homeschool families thought about their time spent using KinderBach with their children, please visit The Old Schoolhouse Review Crew blog here.

I received a three month membership to KinderBach for free as a member of the 2010 TOS Homeschool Review Crew, and I received no other compensation. In return, I agreed to give an honest review of the materials and how they worked for my homeschool family.


Wordless Wednesday

Monday, April 4, 2011

TOS Review: GoGoKabongo

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A few years ago, I had a bit too much time to fill in Lauren's days, and I started letting her play computer games on my laptop. She quickly latched onto a few favorite sites, some educational and some just for fun. I found some excellent options that teach easy preschool skills -- identifying letters, counting objects, matching items, etc. She found ways to just watch videos when she gets on many of those websites.

Recently, we've been exploring a computer game that takes educational computer games a step farther than any other program we've tried. Instead of teaching basic preschool facts, GoGoKabongo helps the child develop critical thinking and problem solving skills, such skills as attention, memory, visualization, spatial awareness, comprehension and more. If you are interested in learning more about these important learning skills, you can check out their full explanations here.

Kabongo mapThe GoGoKabongo website was designed for 4-7 year olds. The complete game is divided into three habitats, and each habitat has three different learning games. You can start with access to Laughter Lake habitat for free, and access to additional habitats costs $4.95. Right now, they are having a special where you can sign up and get two free habitats (Laughter Lake and Galaxy Gardens). If you then want access to the full program (the additional games in Twister Top), you'd only pay $4.95. Please note that this is a one-time fee, not a subscription service like many other online programs.

I asked Lauren to show me her favorite game, and she picked Photo Safari in the Galaxy Gardens area. In this game, Lauren first hunts through the background scenery to find an animal to take a picture of. Then, the animal will show a specific object that it would like to have. Lauren hunts through the scenery again (often scrolling to different pages) to find the specified object. In addition to developing visual scanning skills, Lauren is also learning to pay attention to what object the animal shows her and then to remember that object when she's looking through the scene. Even when she takes a long time or doesn't choose the correct object, this game does not give her any reminder hints.

Another favorite game is the Design a Door activity in the Twister Top area. In this area, the student first sees a decorated door. She is given a short amount of time to look at the various shapes on the door. Then, the shapes are removed, and the child is supposed to redecorate the door to look like the original image. Again, this challenged Lauren's attention skills. She also learned to pay attention to details. For instance, she had to remember how many purple rectangles were on the door and how they were arranged. One of her first doors had two matching objects placed side by side on the door. Later door designs included multiple shapes in various layout combinations to remember.

I am very impressed with the skills that are addressed in the games. My favorite game is Going Buggy in the free Laughter Lake habitat.  One of the cartoon characters reads a short story, and the student places objects in the scene so that it matches the description in the story. It starts off with fairly simple requirements, perhaps only needing one item added to the picture. As the student progresses, the stories become more complex, and more items are needed. For instance, a recent game required the background to be changed to nighttime, the bee to be put near the fire, the orange mushrooms to be added, and then the worm to be placed under the mushrooms. As Lauren works through the levels, she learns to pay attention to the story and then visualize the details on the illustration.


GoGoKabongo includes several parent-friendly features. I can easily check Lauren's progress for each individual game online, and I also receive weekly email progress updates. These updates often include suggestions for other learning activities that I can do with her. For children that love paper and pencil activities, there are a few mazes, dot-to-dots, and coloring pages available for free on the website.

Unfortunately, as much as I liked the games, Lauren didn't. Sometimes she was frustrated because the pages loaded slowly or because the game controls were difficult to figure out. I also suspect that she often asked to play on other websites because she's just more familiar with them and because she can sometimes just watch videos instead of playing games that require her to think. Nevertheless, I'm still very impressed with the quality of GoGoKabongo. This is an online program that I would definitely recommend to other parents. If nothing else, I think every parent that has a preschooler should join and try the free habitats.

If you'd like to read what other homeschool families thought about their time spent using GoGoKabongo, please visit The Old Schoolhouse Review Crew blog here.

I received access to all three habitats on GoGoKabongo for free as a member of the 2010 TOS Homeschool Review Crew, and I received no other compensation. In return, I agreed to give an honest review of the materials and how they worked for my homeschool family.


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